Monarch Butterfly

Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.

Great BIG Nature showcases the wonders of nature.

Our award-winning stories spark conversations, shift perspectives, and inspire new ideas, helping to not only shed new light on our planet’s most pressing environmental challenges, but to also drive change! We tell stories that matter!

This Week’s Top Picks

An experience of a lifetime. Great BIG Nature recently returned from the Galapagos and had the incredible fortune of swimming with a group of dolphins. It is a moment we wish all could experience! Watch for the full story!
You might be surprised to learn one of the loudest mammals on the planet is a lemur. It’s true. So we traveled to the forests of Madagascar's northeast region, in the Anjanaharibe-Sub wildlife preserve, to witness this phenomenon in person!
Great BIG Nature traveled to the remote Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia Canada to document the end of the Southern Most herd of Caribou in the world. This is Must watch stuff!
Travel
Discovery
News

The Hippo Whisperer

Jane Goodall and her son, Grub, are trying to save a hippo sanctuary in Southern Tanzania. We went to tell their incredible story and meet the man they call “The Hippo Whisperer!”

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7 days ago
Great BIG Nature

Looking like a 'mad professor', Marabou storks probably have the worst hairdo's in the entire animal kingdom. And this photo pretty much proves that theory!
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Photo: Josef Gelernter
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Looking like a mad professor, Marabou storks probably have the worst hairdos in the entire animal kingdom. And this photo pretty much proves that theory!
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Josef Gelernter

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I took a German literature course in university that included a short story (can't remember which) about a dysfunctional family. The adult son walked around proclaiming "Ich bin ein Marabou". I always imagined him looking like this.

I expect I am heading towards this look but with more wrinkles.

Poor thing 😂

Wow ! A living Skeksis from The Dark Crystal! 😆

That marabou has better hair than I do. Sigh, big sigh.....

So true - adorable all the same

Reminds me of Christopher Lloyd!

At first glance I thought it was a costume!

This is how I look on Monday morning

These guys are wild. Lots of them in Kenya. They have signs at outdoor restaurants not to feed them.

Not the prettiest but definitely cool!

Real life plague doctor.

Very mad scientist. I bet they have bubbly personalities

awesome

🤣🤣🤣Просто не успел причесаться

Holy shirt... it's me!

My haarkapper se skuld!

Cole Nicholas I like him

Up before the Beak. "Take him down!"

Emma Petri

Vème Élément Ada

everything is beautiful in its own way x

Michelle Katherine See! Looks like your dad!

Cute

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1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

The Brahmin Moth before and after metamorphosis.
Also known as the owl moth, since they are nocturnal, are found in the north of India, Nepal, Bhutan, Myanmar, China, Taiwan, and Japan.
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The Brahmin Moth before and after metamorphosis.
Also known as the owl moth, since they are nocturnal, are found in the north of India, Nepal, Bhutan, Myanmar, China, Taiwan, and Japan. 
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Such beauty before and after!

Amazing!

une merveille

Josh Wolper

Top one is venom.

amazing

Rachel Katie

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1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

We realize this is not a scientific comparison, but its still interesting all the same.
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We realize this is not a scientific comparison, but its still interesting all the same.
Connect with Nature!

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Amazing!

Shit on the floor: we are nature

4 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Feather of a hummingbird!
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Feather of a hummingbird!
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I love feathers, that's so awesome!

We do enjoy them. ❤️

Adorable

How cute!!!

OMG that is soo cool

Ohhhhh, how cute!!!

Laura Neuf Goomishian look how cute and small!

Leuk

Dawn Carey

Jamie Follick

Maria Vasileiou

Angela Melissa

Dawn Tarr-Scott

Melissa Andal Jen Pofahl

Susan Hague !!

Amanda Kirby Tresa Willemin

Annie Delaney

Wow

Rachel Marie

Sharon Stasiuk Soroka

Stacie Hall

too s m o l put it b a c k

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4 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

The real name of this frog is the Blunt-headed Burrowing frog, but we prefer to call it 'Jabba the Hut'. This giant, chubby appearance is due to a self-defense technique in which it inflates itself with air in order to look more formidable when in danger. And as the name suggests, this species spends most of its life living underground. But as soon as the rainy season comes, it emerges in large numbers to breed “explosively” in temporary bodies of water.
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The real name of this frog is the Blunt-headed Burrowing frog, but we prefer to call it Jabba the Hut. This giant, chubby appearance is due to a self-defense technique in which it inflates itself with air in order to look more formidable when in danger. And as the name suggests, this species spends most of its life living underground. But as soon as the rainy season comes, it emerges in large numbers to breed “explosively” in temporary bodies of water. 
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It's me, I'm really not fat, it's just a defense mechanism

Me, after the Thanksgiving meal.

Must be a Hollywood frog. Got a little to much Botox!

He looks uncomfortable lol

Jon Paul Schires this beast lives in Florida and chased me down the sidewalk! You know!!😱😂

I can't believe that such a big thing leaves underground

I have never seen one like that.

Omg I'd die if I seen this dude 🙈

Blake Durdle I dont think you have a big enough terrarium for this dude.

Bring me Solo abd the wookie

I feel like I’ve finally found my spirit animal

Vème Élément Ada

Pauline Wylde

Teagan Walters 😉😅

Lol

Stewart Hopkins

Kayla Marie Reed

Awesome picture 🙀 thank you for sharing

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4 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Look closely... this is a Stonefish, the most venomous fish in the world. They are found in the coastal regions of the Indo-Pacific, and if you hapen to step on one... prepare for intense pain and agony!

Here are the toxic affects in stonefish venom: (Yikes!)
•hyaluronidase that promotes spreading of the venom;
•cardiovascular toxins, including cardioleputin, that are mediated by muscarinic receptors and adrenoreceptors, and which cause bradycardia;
•neuromuscular toxins that cause massive release of acetylcholine and lead to depolarizing neuromuscular blockade;
•trachynilysin, which forms nonselective membrane pores that contribute to the neuromuscular blockage;
•stonustoxin, which produces depolarizing paralysis of the diaphragm, and is also a potent hemolytic and edema-forming toxin, and an inducer of hypotension, counteracting the activity of noradrenalin;
•neoverrucotoxin that has similar activity to stonustoxin;
•verrucotoxin that blocks calcium channels and affects myocardial K+(ATP) channels, inducing hypotension. It also has hemolytic action
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Look closely... this is a Stonefish, the most venomous fish in the world. They are found in the coastal regions of the Indo-Pacific, and if you hapen to step on one... prepare for intense pain and agony!

Here are the toxic affects in stonefish venom: (Yikes!)
•hyaluronidase that promotes spreading of the venom;
•cardiovascular toxins, including cardioleputin, that are mediated by muscarinic receptors and adrenoreceptors, and which cause bradycardia;
•neuromuscular toxins that cause massive release of acetylcholine and lead to depolarizing neuromuscular blockade;
•trachynilysin, which forms nonselective membrane pores that contribute to the neuromuscular blockage;
•stonustoxin, which produces depolarizing paralysis of the diaphragm, and is also a potent hemolytic and edema-forming toxin, and an inducer of hypotension, counteracting the activity of noradrenalin;
•neoverrucotoxin that has similar activity to stonustoxin;
•verrucotoxin that blocks calcium channels and affects myocardial K+(ATP) channels, inducing hypotension. It also has hemolytic action

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Not that fatal. I’ve known many villagers to step on one. Really painful an on crutches for a while though.

And yet another place I won't be visiting! LOL

such amazing camouflage!

He uglay! 😂

4 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

The Kangaroo Island echidna is surely among the world’s most bizarre creatures. It’s covered in sharp, hollow hairs that look like porcupine quills, has an anteater-like tongue and no teeth, and is among the few mammal species that lay eggs. Strangest of all, though, may be echidnas’ mating rituals. When breeding season rolls around, the females release pheromones that attract usually-solitary males from miles around. The males form a line called a “love train” and dutifully follow the female on days-long hikes. When the female decides she’s ready, she lies down and relaxes while the males dig a circular trench around her, then attempt to shove each other out of the ring like tiny sumo wrestlers.
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Photo: Douglas Gimesy
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The Kangaroo Island echidna is surely among the world’s most bizarre creatures. It’s covered in sharp, hollow hairs that look like porcupine quills, has an anteater-like tongue and no teeth, and is among the few mammal species that lay eggs. Strangest of all, though, may be echidnas’ mating rituals. When breeding season rolls around, the females release pheromones that attract usually-solitary males from miles around. The males form a line called a “love train” and dutifully follow the female on days-long hikes. When the female decides she’s ready, she lies down and relaxes while the males dig a circular trench around her, then attempt to shove each other out of the ring like tiny sumo wrestlers.
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Douglas Gimesy

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Thats so amazing to me...lol...totally awesome 🙃🙂🙃

❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

1 month ago
Great BIG Nature

Golden Plover chicks are covered in downy feathers that mimic actual moss to blend in with their surroundings. This is especially helpful since they nest on the ground amongst lichens, moss, grass, and leaves. Helps keep them safe from predators!
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Golden Plover chicks are covered in downy feathers that mimic actual moss to blend in with their surroundings. This is especially helpful since they nest on the ground amongst lichens, moss, grass, and leaves. Helps keep them safe from predators!
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Perfect camouflage as I initially didn't realized there's a chick in the photo as well. Just saw the moss.

What wonderful natural selection is!

wow but where abouts in the world are they? I don't want to stand on one!! 😰😲 I guess they'd be well away from footpaths and mossy banks near footpaths?! 🤞

That is amazing

Why don't you give photo credit? nmsi.is/project/90-arg/ Photo: Camilo Carneiro

Where are they found?

Jenna Walsh

Nikolas Gletner

Stephanie Cornella

Jess Smith

#connectwithnature

Alaina N Chris

Kim Strum 😍🥰

Laura 'Haney' Bush for Emmett

Awesome !!!

Beautiful & amazing.. 😊

Be watchful when mowing the grass.

Wow. Amazing!

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1 month ago
Great BIG Nature

An Atlantic goliath grouper - 800 lbs (362 kg) and about the size of a refrigerator - calmly swims through a swirling school of scads off the coast of Florida. See the full BigPicture: Natural World Photography Competition gallery: bit.ly/3MxwVHD
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Photo: Tom Shlesinger
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An Atlantic goliath grouper - 800 lbs (362 kg) and about the size of a refrigerator - calmly swims through a swirling school of scads off the coast of Florida. See the full BigPicture: Natural World Photography Competition gallery: bit.ly/3MxwVHD 
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Tom Shlesinger

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Ann Gallinger, what an awesome photo!

Now that's a big fish

1 month ago
Great BIG Nature

This is what pollen looks like on the eye of a fly!
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This is what pollen looks like on the eye of a fly! 
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Medienbunker Produktion

Teeny Tiny!

1 month ago
Great BIG Nature

On June 21, 2022, a near complete, mummified baby woolly mammoth was found in the Yukon, Klondike gold fields within Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin Traditional Territory. Miners uncovered the frozen woolly mammoth while excavating through the permafrost. Elders named the mammoth calf 'Nun cho ga', meaning “big baby animal” in the Hän language.
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On June 21, 2022, a near complete, mummified baby woolly mammoth was found in the Yukon, Klondike gold fields within Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin Traditional Territory. Miners uncovered the frozen woolly mammoth while excavating through the permafrost. Elders named the mammoth calf Nun cho ga, meaning “big baby animal” in the Hän language.
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Amazing but sad too

Amazing first time I’ve ever seen a real baby one 👏🐘

I mean how do they know it wasn’t just a regular elephant?

That’s amazing I love wooly 🦣 mammoths 🦣

30000 years in the permafrost!!! Woweee 🤩

This is really as amazing find.

Broken leg. Amazing find.

Spero serva a farci capire e crescere nella sfera più vivibile del sistema.

Cody Kenyon

Amberlon Sanseverino

Benji Amin

Nicki Rosillo

Janet Myers Rana Jones

Keith Chesshir Jr.

Mackenzie Enchelmaier

fuzzy wuzzy wasn't very fuzzy either.

Poor Baby 😢

Dawson Muscutt

Wow

Amazing

Fascinating

Wow!

Amazing!!!

Caleb Murray

Wow Meara Landsburg mear

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