Monarch Butterfly

Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.

Great BIG Nature showcases the wonders of nature.

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This Week’s Top Picks

An experience of a lifetime. Great BIG Nature recently returned from the Galapagos and had the incredible fortune of swimming with a group of dolphins. It is a moment we wish all could experience! Watch for the full story!
You might be surprised to learn one of the loudest mammals on the planet is a lemur. It’s true. So we traveled to the forests of Madagascar's northeast region, in the Anjanaharibe-Sub wildlife preserve, to witness this phenomenon in person!
Great BIG Nature traveled to the remote Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia Canada to document the end of the Southern Most herd of Caribou in the world. This is Must watch stuff!
Travel
Discovery
News

The Hippo Whisperer

Jane Goodall and her son, Grub, are trying to save a hippo sanctuary in Southern Tanzania. We went to tell their incredible story and meet the man they call “The Hippo Whisperer!”

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1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

It might surprise you, but there are about 5,000 different species of ladybugs in the world. These much loved critters are also known as lady beetles or ladybird beetles. They come in many different colors and patterns, but the most familiar in North America is the seven-spotted ladybug. And if you happen to see one, in many cultures, ladybugs are considered good luck.
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It might surprise you, but there are about 5,000 different species of ladybugs in the world. These much loved critters are also known as lady beetles or ladybird beetles. They come in many different colors and patterns, but the most familiar in North America is the seven-spotted ladybug. And if you happen to see one, in many cultures, ladybugs are considered good luck.
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Just thinking that lady bugs just wouldn't look as cute if they were called "man bugs"!

Got lots in my backyard right now. Hope that means lots of good luck. 😁

I was bit by an orange one..

Look Auntie Dot Dorothy!❤🐞❤

Miiiiiira! Cuántas Catarinas. Que bonitas

Elizabeth Brink

Elizabeth Hanson

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1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

It is a very strange and unlikely relationship!
Tarantulas are typically nocturnal ambush predators, waiting hours for an opportunity to pounce on virtually any animal they might be capable of subduing. Yet, no matter how close to the tarantula a humming frog ventures, it seems immune, and researchers now suspect that’s simply because the frog’s skin secretions taste bad. The humming frog clearly benefits from its association with the tarantula. Not only does the spider’s burrow provide a cool hideaway, but the mother tarantula aggressively defends her nest from predators - including those that might also prey on frogs. Whether the spider benefits from the relationship is less clear, but scientists think the frogs may help to rid the burrow and its surroundings of ants and fly larvae that might prey on her eggs and young. Nature works in mysterious ways...
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Photo: Emanuele Biggi
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It is a very strange and unlikely relationship!
Tarantulas are typically nocturnal ambush predators, waiting hours for an opportunity to pounce on virtually any animal they might be capable of subduing. Yet, no matter how close to the tarantula a humming frog ventures, it seems immune, and researchers now suspect that’s simply because the frog’s skin secretions taste bad. The humming frog clearly benefits from its association with the tarantula. Not only does the spider’s burrow provide a cool hideaway, but the mother tarantula aggressively defends her nest from predators - including those that might also prey on frogs. Whether the spider benefits from the relationship is less clear, but scientists think the frogs may help to rid the burrow and its surroundings of ants and fly larvae that might prey on her eggs and young. Nature works in mysterious ways...
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Photo: Emanuele Biggi

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What’s the frog’s favorite tune

Que cosas tan extrañas tiene la naturaleza

Michael Ekim

Oh maman j 'ai peur 😭,😮😮😮elle est grosse celle là 😮😮😮

Mother knows best

Josephine Garvey

Blake Durdle Rebeccah Beatty still dont like spiders

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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Great BIG Nature recently returned from an expedition to the Antarctic to film humpback whales. We followed a group of researchers and learned how they get the samples they need, and what it could mean for the whales survival.
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Just wonderful Brian, would have adored to join in on the research! That trip changed me forever. Thank you for sharing this and the work you do, amazing

Amazing to be so close to where you can smell their "fish breath" as they exhale. Good work with the DNA sampling.

Whales absolutely mesmerize me. I could watch footage like this of whales for hours.

Cool

2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

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the similarity between feathers and leaves

amazing

Impresionante toma

Stunning!

Lenses

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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

When you stumble across a mushroom that looks like this, it's because of a process called 'guttation'. Basically it's the mushroom excreting excess water... and for some, the end result looks absolutely delicous! Also, new research suggests these excretions might have some powerful antioxidant properties that just might benefit human health one day.
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Bleeding tooth fungus. Is not known to be edible. But can be used for dyes

Halloween mushrooms. Looks gorey to me not yummy.

They look like they are made of jelly!

Hey Joe while we are on here do you know ol John primble he will cut ye

très beaux champignons

Guarantee there's EXPIERMENTS being done & if it's a BENEFIT it will never be heard of..

Susan Wolper Josh Wolper

Genevieve Neumeier Lee Harris

Nathaniel Martin

Yea that's rite they don't want a good thing you know Joe what ya know Joe lol

Erin Pope here’s one for you.

Yes! Try every mushroom!

Karen Ann Bradley Hammond Margaret Morgan

Jennifer, have you seen this?

Nature is beautiful ❤ and fascinating

Wow incredible!! 😍

Bizarre!

So amazing

Looks extremely tasty.

That looks staggeringly good… Reminds of a Romanian donut dessert I was served recently, in fact

Looks like icecream

Olivier Grégoire😯

Delicious???? This looks horrifying

Tom Bertino i thought you would like this.

Doc, we've got a bleeder, stat!!!!

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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

If you haven't been to the Yukon, this is what you are missing. The rich auburns and yellows of fall shine along the shores of Kathleen Lake in Kluane National Park.
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If you havent been to the Yukon, this is what you are missing. The rich auburns and yellows of fall shine along the shores of Kathleen Lake in Kluane National Park. 
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3 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

There are about 100,000 different types of sea shells in our oceans - but this is one of the most interesting. The Venus comb murex, scientific name Murex pecten, is a species of large predatory sea snail. This species is native to Indo-Pacific waters, and they are serious hunters. Their favourite food is other mollusks. In turn, they can be food for large bottom-feeding fish such as stingrays and some sharks. However, their sharp, long spines may ward off some attacks.
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There are about 100,000 different types of sea shells in our oceans - but this is one of the most interesting. The Venus comb murex, scientific name Murex pecten, is a species of large predatory sea snail. This species is native to Indo-Pacific waters, and they are serious hunters. Their favourite food is other mollusks. In turn, they can be food for large bottom-feeding fish such as stingrays and some sharks. However, their sharp, long spines may ward off some attacks.
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So different!

Nature is amazingx

How amazing

3 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Espinhaço Mountain Range / Brazil.
Photo: Augusto Gomes
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Espinhaço Mountain Range / Brazil.
Photo: Augusto Gomes
3 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Bombay Bush Frogs in their eggs.
With these frogs, the male maintains a territory, positioning himself on a twig or leaf overhanging a stream and calling repeatedly. The female arrives in response to these calls and deposits a small clutch of eggs on the exact spot from which the male was calling. She then returns to the stream and he stands over the eggs and fertilizes them. In this way, the male decides where the eggs are to be laid. After 12 to 15 days, the developing tadpoles emerge from the jelly-clad eggs and drop into the stream below, where they continue their development.
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Photo: Girish Gowda
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Bombay Bush Frogs in their eggs. 
With these frogs, the male maintains a territory, positioning himself on a twig or leaf overhanging a stream and calling repeatedly. The female arrives in response to these calls and deposits a small clutch of eggs on the exact spot from which the male was calling. She then returns to the stream and he stands over the eggs and fertilizes them. In this way, the male decides where the eggs are to be laid. After 12 to 15 days, the developing tadpoles emerge from the jelly-clad eggs and drop into the stream below, where they continue their development.
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Photo: Girish Gowda

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Beautiful photo! Females choose which calling males they will give eggs -- the ones with the best sites. Sexual selection put males to work finding those spots and proposing to females that they did best. Females assess & "call their shots," as in nearly all animal mating systems with separate sexes -- by choosing which remaining males' sites are, in fact, best, each positioning her eggs at HER most preferred site among them. "Thanks boys, for showing me all possible "finalist" spots! Now, keep at it and keep those kids alive! See ya!"

These look much more developed than the usual tadpole! They look to have almost completely metamorphosed

Matt Coogan 🤗

4 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Fruit bats feed on a wide range of fruits and flowers, and they play a key role in dispersing seeds. This particular fruit bat was making its way through the canopy to feast on custard apples.
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Photo: Sitaram Raul
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Fruit bats feed on a wide range of fruits and flowers, and they play a key role in dispersing seeds. This particular fruit bat was making its way through the canopy to feast on custard apples.
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Photo: Sitaram Raul

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Important pollinators, as well!

Un momento estético

A beautiful shot.

Bats are cool

Incredible shot 👏👏😄💕!!

We watched the PBS Nature program about the Mexican bats, it was very educational. Not a fan of them, but would never harm them either. Good pollinators.

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4 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Incredible world of butterfly eggs. These are but a few of the 17,500 different type of butterfly eggs in the world. Butterflies, being oviparous insects, lay eggs either one at a time or in clusters. Butterflies typically lay about 100-300 eggs at a time, but some species can lay more than 1000 eggs.
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Incredible world of butterfly eggs. These are but a few of the 17,500 different type of butterfly eggs in the world. Butterflies, being oviparous insects, lay eggs either one at a time or in clusters. Butterflies typically lay about 100-300 eggs at a time, but some species can lay more than 1000 eggs.
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4 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Often described as "unicorns of the sea," narwhals are beautiful creatures usually identified by a tusk protruding from their heads. But did you know this tusk is much more than it seems? What is really a massive canine tooth that grows out of its upper lip, it is also a spiral wrapping of nerves – so it's a sense organ that can detect subtleties in the temperature, salinity, and particle presence of its ocean environment. But new research suggests this tusk may also sense sound waves, allowing them a detailed acoustical construction of their often dark Arctic ocean environment.
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Photo: Brian Skerry
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Often described as unicorns of the sea, narwhals are beautiful creatures usually identified by a tusk protruding from their heads. But did you know this tusk is much more than it seems? What is really a massive canine tooth that grows out of its upper lip, it is also a spiral wrapping of nerves – so its a sense organ that can detect subtleties in the temperature, salinity, and particle presence of its ocean environment. But new research suggests this tusk may also sense sound waves, allowing them a detailed acoustical construction of their often dark Arctic ocean environment.
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Photo: Brian Skerry

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Thank you Chris this is a very informative read.

So amazing! Legend was that making a tusk into a chalice would neutralize any poison in the drink!

It's an enlarged tooth.

Amazing creatures!

thank you for the pic & the info

Nature is amazing

Julie Newsome - did you do your narwhal trip?

Y de los ruidos producidos por los humanos 😞

Mike Wing the tale of the narwhal 🤣🤣🤣

Amy Handy

Kathryn Warren

Danny Grimaldi

🐟🐬🐠🐳🐋🐚🐙🐠🐟

Sarah Kvas 🦄🐋🤩

Kelly Smiley Lindsey Grace Smiley😉

Brandi Margaret

I’m 62 and did not know about this whale(?)! What is their territory? Thank you for sharing.

Addison and Emma

Jacqueline Buhler

Cool!!!

Tara Allan

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