Monarch Butterfly

Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.

Great BIG Nature showcases the wonders of nature.

Our award-winning stories spark conversations, shift perspectives, and inspire new ideas, helping to not only shed new light on our planet’s most pressing environmental challenges, but to also drive change! We tell stories that matter!

This Week’s Top Picks

An experience of a lifetime. Great BIG Nature recently returned from the Galapagos and had the incredible fortune of swimming with a group of dolphins. It is a moment we wish all could experience! Watch for the full story!
You might be surprised to learn one of the loudest mammals on the planet is a lemur. It’s true. So we traveled to the forests of Madagascar's northeast region, in the Anjanaharibe-Sub wildlife preserve, to witness this phenomenon in person!
Great BIG Nature traveled to the remote Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia Canada to document the end of the Southern Most herd of Caribou in the world. This is Must watch stuff!
Travel
Discovery
News

The Hippo Whisperer

Jane Goodall and her son, Grub, are trying to save a hippo sanctuary in Southern Tanzania. We went to tell their incredible story and meet the man they call “The Hippo Whisperer!”

Connect with Great BIG Nature

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
6 hours ago
Great BIG Nature

Golden Plover chicks are covered in downy feathers that mimic actual moss to blend in with their surroundings. This is especially helpful since they nest on the ground amongst lichens, moss, grass, and leaves. Helps keep them safe from predators!
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

Golden Plover chicks are covered in downy feathers that mimic actual moss to blend in with their surroundings. This is especially helpful since they nest on the ground amongst lichens, moss, grass, and leaves. Helps keep them safe from predators!
Connect with Nature!

Comment on Facebook

Perfect camouflage as I initially didn't realized there's a chick in the photo as well. Just saw the moss.

That is amazing

Where are they found?

Wow. Amazing!

1 day ago
Great BIG Nature

An Atlantic goliath grouper - 800 lbs (362 kg) and about the size of a refrigerator - calmly swims through a swirling school of scads off the coast of Florida. See the full BigPicture: Natural World Photography Competition gallery: bit.ly/3MxwVHD
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Tom Shlesinger
... See MoreSee Less

An Atlantic goliath grouper - 800 lbs (362 kg) and about the size of a refrigerator - calmly swims through a swirling school of scads off the coast of Florida. See the full BigPicture: Natural World Photography Competition gallery: bit.ly/3MxwVHD 
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Tom Shlesinger

Comment on Facebook

Now that's a big fish

2 days ago
Great BIG Nature

This is what pollen looks like on the eye of a fly!
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

This is what pollen looks like on the eye of a fly! 
Connect with Nature!
4 days ago
Great BIG Nature

On June 21, 2022, a near complete, mummified baby woolly mammoth was found in the Yukon, Klondike gold fields within Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin Traditional Territory. Miners uncovered the frozen woolly mammoth while excavating through the permafrost. Elders named the mammoth calf 'Nun cho ga', meaning “big baby animal” in the Hän language.
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

On June 21, 2022, a near complete, mummified baby woolly mammoth was found in the Yukon, Klondike gold fields within Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin Traditional Territory. Miners uncovered the frozen woolly mammoth while excavating through the permafrost. Elders named the mammoth calf Nun cho ga, meaning “big baby animal” in the Hän language.
Connect with Nature!

Comment on Facebook

Amazing but sad too

Amazing first time I’ve ever seen a real baby one 👏🐘

I mean how do they know it wasn’t just a regular elephant?

30000 years in the permafrost!!! Woweee 🤩

That’s amazing I love wooly 🦣 mammoths 🦣

This is really as amazing find.

Broken leg. Amazing find.

Spero serva a farci capire e crescere nella sfera più vivibile del sistema.

Cody Kenyon

Amberlon Sanseverino

Benji Amin

Nicki Rosillo

Janet Myers Rana Jones

Keith Chesshir Jr.

Mackenzie Enchelmaier

fuzzy wuzzy wasn't very fuzzy either.

Poor Baby 😢

Dawson Muscutt

Wow

Amazing

Fascinating

Wow!

Amazing!!!

Caleb Murray

Wow Meara Landsburg mear

View more comments

5 days ago
Great BIG Nature

The largest known plant on Earth - a seagrass roughly three times the size of Manhattan - has been discovered off the coast of Australia. Using genetic testing, scientists have determined a large underwater meadow in Western Australia is in fact one plant. It is believed to have spread from a single seed over at least 4,500 years and covers about 200 sq km (77 sq miles), researchers from the University of Western Australia said.
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Rachel Austin
... See MoreSee Less

The largest known plant on Earth - a seagrass roughly three times the size of Manhattan - has been discovered off the coast of Australia. Using genetic testing, scientists have determined a large underwater meadow in Western Australia is in fact one plant. It is believed to have spread from a single seed over at least 4,500 years and covers about 200 sq km (77 sq miles), researchers from the University of Western Australia said.
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Rachel Austin

Comment on Facebook

Proud of my big sister, one of the leading researchers on this one - Dr Elizabeth Sinclair.

Lori Dykhouse Dutton Show Jerry. We were talking about Aspen Grove being largest. So cool

Save the manatees!

Absolutely amazing!

6 days ago
Great BIG Nature

If you didn't do particularly well in gym class, then this might be the frog for you. The pumpkin toadlet, native to the mountains of Brazilian rainforests, is about the size of a Tic Tac. It also happens to be a frog that every time it attempts to jump, it crashes pitifully to the ground. These amphibians launch themselves into the air, but lack the internal balancing required to correct themselves mid-jump. So instead of landing on their feet, they spin out of control and crash onto their tiny froggy butts, backs or faces. In fact, they are probably the worst jumpers we've ever seen. But despite their ungraceful landings, the frogs appear to be doing just fine. A recent study found no evidence they get injured during their lopsided leaps.

To view a video of these frogs terrible jumps - click below.
www.cbc.ca/player/play/2044962371847/

Photo: Luiz F Ribeiro
... See MoreSee Less

If you didnt do particularly well in gym class, then this might be the frog for you. The pumpkin toadlet, native to the mountains of Brazilian rainforests, is about the size of a Tic Tac. It also happens to be a frog that every time it attempts to jump, it crashes pitifully to the ground. These amphibians launch themselves into the air, but lack the internal balancing required to correct themselves mid-jump. So instead of landing on their feet, they spin out of control and crash onto their tiny froggy butts, backs or faces. In fact, they are probably the worst jumpers weve ever seen. But despite their ungraceful landings, the frogs appear to be doing just fine. A recent study found no evidence they get injured during their lopsided leaps.

To view a video of these frogs terrible jumps - click below. 
https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/2044962371847/

Photo: Luiz F Ribeiro

Comment on Facebook

Could explain why it looks so peeved!

Poor little froggy. It has learned how to jump, but not how to stick a landing. Perhaps with more practice.

And yet it jumps. ❤

They are so tiny!

Landing on your feet is highly overrated.

Amazing !

Muy hermosa ❤️❤️

Oddly enough this tale gives me hope for the human race. 🥹

Josh Hinton bless

Cute

Your Spirit Animal Amanda Williams

Omg that’s so sad.

View more comments

1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

Caterpillars appear to have lots of legs but only 6 are true legs. The other legs are false legs (called prolegs) that help the caterpillar to climb and move around plant surfaces. Prolegs may be as many as 10 and are usually located on a caterpillar’s abdomen.
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

Caterpillars appear to have lots of legs but only 6 are true legs. The other legs are false legs (called prolegs) that help the caterpillar to climb and move around plant surfaces. Prolegs may be as many as 10 and are usually located on a caterpillar’s abdomen.
Connect with Nature!

Comment on Facebook

Awwwww its little sandals 💕

Adorable.

Feets Tiana Gleim

Bonito ha de ser el abrazo de una oruga.

spécial

Whoever make this must be knowledgeable, merciful, and capable ..

The little feets

Sneaky caterpillars!

Kierra Angela-Lee Doherty

View more comments

1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

Scientists have discovered that venom from a honeybee just might be a treatment for breast cancer. A molecule called melittin – the very same substance responsible for creating the painful sensation caused by the bee’s sting – is also capable of demolishing breast cancer cells. “The venom was extremely potent,” said Dr. Ciara Duffy, who led the Australian research. “We found that melittin can completely destroy cancer cell membranes within 60 minutes.” And unlike chemotherapy and radiation treatments – honeybee venom had no negative effects on surrounding healthy cells.
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

Scientists have discovered that venom from a honeybee just might be a treatment for breast cancer. A molecule called melittin – the very same substance responsible for creating the painful sensation caused by the bee’s sting – is also capable of demolishing breast cancer cells. “The venom was extremely potent,” said Dr. Ciara Duffy, who led the Australian research. “We found that melittin can completely destroy cancer cell membranes within 60 minutes.” And unlike chemotherapy and radiation treatments – honeybee venom had no negative effects on surrounding healthy cells. 
Connect with Nature!

Comment on Facebook

Sounds great. I pray a synthetic version can be created. For a bee to sting, it dies. Our planet needs bees alive to survive

So maybe we will save the bees now that are becoming threatened

Wonderful news, however, let's hope this is not an excuse to kill the rest of the bees in the planet. We need bees for our planet to stay alive.

That’s exciting news. Let’s hope it advances into real-life treatment.

"the very same substance responsible for creating the painful sensation caused by the bee’s sting". Injecting that to destroy cancer cell, that must hurt!

That’s great news!!❤️

And to get it the bee dies. How wonderful. Come up with a better way to do this.

Wow, wouldn't that be great!!

Perhaps you can share the link to study? Or ware we just supposed to take your word for it?

Great news for all the boobees 😊

My question is: how do they extract the venom from the bees? It’s not like milking snakes.

Hurray for the bees!!

It would be great

That is amazing😲👍

exciting news yes But our honey bee family is diminishing Once they sting you they die 🙁

How about bee allergy?

Very interesting.

You always post such interesting stuff! Thanks ❤️

Genial.

Australia is also a lead concerning mental illness research and treatment.

Wow!!!! Guess it pays to pay attention to Mother Nature!

Sandra Bee

😲😲😲

Lisa Calderone 😲❤️❤️❤️❤️

🙏🙏🙏

View more comments

2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Called “shaker muscles”, the rattlesnakes tail muscles fire at 100X per second, as fast as a hummingbirds wing beat! Their rattles are made up of loosely fitting hollow keratin buttons, designed to amplify the sound as they clash against each other in a blur. The result? A startlingly loud noise designed to catch your attention! “Step on me, and you WILL be sorry”. Be sure to turn your sound up!
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Doesn’t sound like a rattle to me. More like a buzzing bee.

Great video!

I used to kill them in Fla, we were building our house, 3 of them was 6ft,

2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

This image captures a rarely observed moment up close: cactus bees swarming together in a mating ball, each male eager to become companions with a female who is in the middle of this madness. Its all about trying to get the ultimate position. And often, it doesn't end well for a bee or two...
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Karine Aigne
... See MoreSee Less

This image captures a rarely observed moment up close: cactus bees swarming together in a mating ball, each male eager to become companions with a female who is in the middle of this madness. Its all about trying to get the ultimate position. And often, it doesnt end well for a bee or two...
Connect with Nature!
Photo:  Karine Aigne

Comment on Facebook

That poor female!! Even in nature...🙄🥹

How do they mate,without stinging each other?

Aún así se ven hermosas 😍

اﻹسلام يحرم الرق لكن شيوخ المسلمين فسرو القرأن بمزاجهم + جهلهم + تسييس الدين لصالح أمير المؤمنين .

Judith Rawner

To bee or not to bee!

Gertraud Webb

I thought this was a murder ball

Floyd Peplinski

View more comments

3 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Macabre masquerade: What you see is a deceptive gimic... a plant that resembles the rotting flesh of a dead animal for its very survival. This rare plant (Rhizanthes Lowii) is endemic to Borneo and can only be found in exceptionally wet and dense rainforests. it is also a complete parasite, having no leaves, stems, or roots of its own, and growing completely within a host vine for its sustenance. The flowers, which are only open for two days, smell and look so convincing that carrion flies are duped into laying their eggs, often carrying away the plant’s pollen so it can continue its parasitic journey elsewhere!
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Chien Lee
... See MoreSee Less

Macabre masquerade: What you see is a deceptive gimic... a plant that resembles the rotting flesh of a dead animal for its very survival. This rare plant (Rhizanthes Lowii) is endemic to Borneo and can only be found in exceptionally wet and dense rainforests. it is also a complete parasite, having no leaves, stems, or roots of its own, and growing completely within a host vine for its sustenance. The flowers, which are only open for two days, smell and look so convincing that carrion flies are duped into laying their eggs, often carrying away the plant’s pollen so it can continue its parasitic journey elsewhere!
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Chien Lee

Comment on Facebook

Atlas Grace....another side of nature...its all so lit!

😲

Killian Darden Victoria Leigh Darden

So what does it eat, flies?

Это же раффлезия?

Nature is beautiful

Amazing

View more comments

Load more

3 million and counting…

That’s how many views we get each month.
Thanks for your support.