Monarch Butterfly

Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.

Great BIG Nature showcases the wonders of nature.

Our award-winning stories spark conversations, shift perspectives, and inspire new ideas, helping to not only shed new light on our planet’s most pressing environmental challenges, but to also drive change! We tell stories that matter!

This Week’s Top Picks

An experience of a lifetime. Great BIG Nature recently returned from the Galapagos and had the incredible fortune of swimming with a group of dolphins. It is a moment we wish all could experience! Watch for the full story!
You might be surprised to learn one of the loudest mammals on the planet is a lemur. It’s true. So we traveled to the forests of Madagascar's northeast region, in the Anjanaharibe-Sub wildlife preserve, to witness this phenomenon in person!
Great BIG Nature traveled to the remote Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia Canada to document the end of the Southern Most herd of Caribou in the world. This is Must watch stuff!
Travel
Discovery
News

The Hippo Whisperer

Jane Goodall and her son, Grub, are trying to save a hippo sanctuary in Southern Tanzania. We went to tell their incredible story and meet the man they call “The Hippo Whisperer!”

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1 day ago
Great BIG Nature

Watch to see the chicks hatch at the end. Great video.
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Nature is so great!

So cool to watch! Thanks!

The miracle of nature! 💙

Really fun to watch! What a lot of chicks 🐣

Delightful!

Thank You for Sharing… Busy busy ..mom..

Magnifique!

Parents? It’s just mum

So cool!

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3 days ago
Great BIG Nature

The life cycle of a butterfly.
There are four stages in the metamorphosis of butterflies and moths: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.
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The life cycle of a butterfly. 
There are four stages in the metamorphosis of butterflies and moths: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.
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🥰🥰🥰 Allison Mayert Braun

Rachel Marie

3 days ago
Great BIG Nature

Look closely... how do you think this battle ended?
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Look closely... how do you think this battle ended?
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Hippo won. Wildebeest lived another day.

I don’t like the look of the Wildebeest’s nose. 🙁

Hippos Never lose.

Crocodile

I’m bettin on the hippo, they are ferocious animals!

Hippo....fast land animal....and jaws that crush! Met them in a campground in Swaziland....not to be fooled with!

Un hippopotame protège un gnou ?

My mon is on the Hippo..

Olivier Grégoire

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5 days ago
Great BIG Nature

Snow Leopard seen on the peaks near Everest.
A snow leopard has been found above 5000 m (16,000 ft) in Khumbu in the Everest region. American photographer Kittiya Pawlowski captured the photos on October 8. Just imagine hiking to the top of the world and 3/4's the way up you see a snow leopard! Crazy. For any animal to survive in this harsh environment, at this altitude... is incredible!
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Photo credit: Kittiya Pawlowski
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Snow Leopard seen on the peaks near Everest.    
A snow leopard has been found above 5000 m (16,000 ft) in Khumbu in the Everest region. American photographer Kittiya Pawlowski captured the photos on October 8. Just imagine hiking to the top of the world and 3/4s the way up you see a snow leopard! Crazy. For any animal to survive in this harsh environment, at this altitude... is incredible! 
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Photo credit: Kittiya PawlowskiImage attachmentImage attachment

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This female photographer went through hardships to get these photos. I have been following her since I first found her photos. I wish you would add the most stunning photo she took which was part of this series of photos. I would add it here but there is no way to do so. A sheer white vertical side of a mountain... It's incredible!

How fortunate for you to see this. Beautiful photos of this rare cat and the Himalayas. Thank you for sharing it.

So lonely and beautiful at the same time.

Oh wow brutal and beautiful.

Reminds me of the Lion King. Let's get our climate cleaned up so these animals can survive what humans have done. Let them live! They can't speak for themselves unless it's thru death.

Stunning find and photos. Animals are amazing.

Stunning photos. Eerie fierce survivor. Wish someone would tell us what’s to eat up there.

Yes wow! But it is called a SNOW leopard for a reason I imagine! Beautiful pictures.

What a GORGEOUS capture on film.

Nature never ceases to surprise us 🤯🤩❤️

Fantastic discovery of the snow leopard on Everest! Quite a shot!

How do they even find food sources that high? 😮

Stunning. Secret Life of Walter Mitty! 😉

Nothing else lives at that altitude. What’s the point in being up there if there’s nothing to eat

He’s going to eat the fallen climbers

Amazing photos

The mountain will win in the end

That's beautiful

What would they feed on at that elevation?

Awesome picture!

Unreal, Mother nature is so powerful 💪🤙❤️

Stunning ❤️

Beautiful

What’s it eating up there?

Stunning!

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7 days ago
Great BIG Nature

This kind of shows, not every predator in the ocean has teeth. In this image, a fish has been captured by a Compass jellyfish. And these rubbery looking things dont eat just fish, they will feast on crabs, even other jelly fish. And for humans, be aware, they give a nasty sting. If that's not enough, once they have stung you, they often leave the tentacle behind which can continue to sting even when not connected to their body.
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This kind of shows, not every predator in the ocean has teeth. In this image, a fish has been captured by a Compass jellyfish. And these rubbery looking things dont eat just fish, they will feast on crabs, even other jelly fish. And for humans, be aware, they give a nasty sting. If thats not enough, once they have stung you, they often leave the tentacle behind which can continue to sting even when not connected to their body.
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I hope they were both OK. ❤🐟🐠❤

I’ll have a dozen to go

That poor fish. The look on his face says it all. 😞

Incroyable

Incroyable 😮😮😮

Amazing

I hope someone put it back in the water.

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1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

The Brazilian Jewel, Typhochlaena seladonia, is a trapdoor tarantula. Found in Bahia and Sergipe Brazil, they create camouflaged trapdoors in the bark of trees in order to keep themselves hidden and ambush prey. In the wild, these tarantulas are observed ripping bark off of a tree in a circular pattern, then covering itself with the bark waiting for its next meal.
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The Brazilian Jewel, Typhochlaena seladonia, is a trapdoor tarantula. Found in Bahia and Sergipe Brazil, they create camouflaged trapdoors in the bark of trees in order to keep themselves hidden and ambush prey. In the wild, these tarantulas are observed ripping bark off of a tree in a circular pattern, then covering itself with the bark waiting for its next meal. 
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Is it poisonous? Does it bite?

I thought I was looking at a well-done craft project!

Never thought I'd see a pretty tarantula! It doesn't even look scary!

That looks like a lovely brooch ;)

Beautiful, and I am not fond of spiders

Wow 😮 beauty where you least expect it!

Amazing creatures!

Tarantula hun <3

Stunning creature! 🥰

Incroyable 👏👏par contre elle est belle est a l 'air très dangereuse 🤣je suis arachnophobe

Crystal Westmoreland Here is your baby a tarantula ❤️

Andy Thijs

Omg. Are they poinous?

Rachel Katie

Christie Elias Collins so prettttty😍

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1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

A common field mushroom has the potential to produce one billion offspring in a single day, and that tremendous reproductive output happens here, in the gills. This dust is actually tens of thousands of microscopic spores—spores so small that it takes 25,000 of them to cover a pinhead. If all the spores released grew into mushrooms, the spores produced by just one gill would cover 13 sq/km.
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Amazing cinematography! It's memorizing 😍

Beautiful!!

Debbie W Holscher dads worst nightmare 😳

MondiMan ta ko grándi bo ta bezeg ku ne broer

Steel Red

Abby Gibson

Christy Walsh

Bridget Maryott

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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Yartsa Gunbu is the most expensive fungus in the world. Also known as Himalayan Viagra, this fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) is a parasite that infects ghost moth caterpillars, which live at altitudes between 3,000 and 5,000m on the tibetan plateau. In the late summer, the ghost moth caterpillars shed their skin, making them vulnerable to the fungus, which then digests the inside of the larvae and kills/mummifies it. In the spring, the body shoots out of the caterpillar's head and is ready to be harvested. Yes it sounds gross, but its how nature works sometimes. In the end, this fungus, which is thought to have many medicinal benefits, can fetch as much as $50,000 / lb, which is more than gold!
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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

These giant tunnels in South America aren't caves – they’re prehistoric burrows! Go exploring certain rock faces in South America, and you might come across strange, smooth-walled tunnels cutting through the earth, some so large you could stand up in them. At first, you might suspect these were simple caves, but caves are usually formed by water dissolving rock. These tunnels are different: up and down the walls, you can see marks that were clearly made by something with enormous claws. And now, scientists think they know what dug them - Giant Ground Sloths! The largest, like Megatherium and Eremotherium, could grow to be bigger than a rhino – and they were built for burrowing. Over the past few decades, researchers have found more than 1,500 of these palaeoburrows across southern Brazil and Argentina.
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Photos: Frank Heinrich
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These giant tunnels in South America arent caves – they’re prehistoric burrows! Go exploring certain rock faces in South America, and you might come across strange, smooth-walled tunnels cutting through the earth, some so large you could stand up in them. At first, you might suspect these were simple caves, but caves are usually formed by water dissolving rock. These tunnels are different: up and down the walls, you can see marks that were clearly made by something with enormous claws. And now, scientists think they know what dug them - Giant Ground Sloths! The largest, like Megatherium and Eremotherium, could grow to be bigger than a rhino – and they were built for burrowing. Over the past few decades, researchers have found more than 1,500 of these palaeoburrows across southern Brazil and Argentina. 
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Photos: Frank HeinrichImage attachment

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Before giant sloths became extinct, they were the avocado tree’s means of spreading it’s seeds. They used to eat the fruit, then deposit the seeds via their faeces. Now that task has been taken over by people. slothconservation.org/love-avocados-thank-the-giant-ground-sloths/

Perhaps from such tunnels come myths about underground roads connecting different parts of the world.

Amazing and incredible 😳👌🏽

I assume Dee Brian Keating was disappointed it they weren't from giant naked mole rats.

Ya right!

Katie Blauvelt Julia Frank my mind is blown

Natalee 😳

Insane how big and strong they would have been.

Cool.

Fascinating!

Amazing

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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Like something from a horror movie, the African Armoured Ground Cricket has some strange defence mechanisms. In fact, despite its name, it's not even a true cricket, but a member of the katydid family. Found in the Namib Desert, this cricket is deemed the warrior of all crickets, with an armoured exoskeleton containing 5 rows of spine that shield the back, as well as spikes on the front. However, if its armor fails to scare off a possible attack, this flightless cricket puts on a defensive show to rival most others. When attacked from overhead, it auto-hemorrhages, or “reflex bleeds”—squeezing putrid hemolymph (insect blood) from dozens of pores across its exoskeleton. When attacked from the side, the cricket squirts blood from pores hidden behind its legs. Should all of these defenses fail, the armored cricket has one last option, essentially spilling its guts (regurgitating its last meal) and scurrying away to leave a befuddled predator in its wake. Now that's resourceful!
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Photo: Emanuele Biggi
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Like something from a horror movie, the African Armoured Ground Cricket has some strange defence mechanisms. In fact, despite its name, its not even a true cricket, but a member of the katydid family. Found in the Namib Desert, this cricket is deemed the warrior of all crickets, with an armoured exoskeleton containing 5 rows of spine that shield the back, as well as spikes on the front. However, if its armor fails to scare off a possible attack, this flightless cricket puts on a defensive show to rival most others. When attacked from overhead, it auto-hemorrhages, or “reflex bleeds”—squeezing putrid hemolymph (insect blood) from dozens of pores across its exoskeleton. When attacked from the side, the cricket squirts blood from pores hidden behind its legs. Should all of these defenses fail, the armored cricket has one last option, essentially spilling its guts (regurgitating its last meal) and scurrying away to leave a befuddled predator in its wake. Now thats resourceful!
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Photo: Emanuele Biggi

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We saw literally millions of these in parts of Namibia earlier this year. Getting crushed on roads, then hundreds would move in and feast on the squashed ones. We were told they could be handled - they can't, my wife was bitten quite quickly by one!

Nature never seizes to amaze me. Just mindblowing ❤❤❤❤

A bug I have to admire!

Really looks like a grasshopper.

2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

This photo has not been altered. What you are looking at is a tiger that was playing in the mud.
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Photo: Harsha Maklvankar
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This photo has not been altered. What you are looking at is a tiger that was playing in the mud.
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Photo: Harsha Maklvankar

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Yummy! Chocolate Tiger.

Wow he knows how to create straight lines of dirt? Lolol

Might be a Yellow Lab in disguise?

Halloween!😃🎊😺

Amazing

"Puddle Cat"!!

Jackie Fell, mad dog !

Briony Smith

I call Tiger $hit! He walked himself in back legs first, never got a spot on his front paws??? 😂🤣

So fake you ain't going to have no straight line if you've been playing in the mud

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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

A lion's tongue is rougher than coarse sandpaper. Its lingual spines, or papillae, make the tongue so rough that if a lion licked the back of your hand only a few times, you would be left without any skin.
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A lions tongue is rougher than coarse sandpaper. Its lingual spines, or papillae, make the tongue so rough that if a lion licked the back of your hand only a few times, you would be left without any skin. 
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Great! Now I got to worry about that too.

House cat "evolved". Her tongue is also sand-papery. But luckily not to this extent!

Perfectly designed to rasp raw meat from bone. Amazing.

I’d let one lick my heels a few times.

My cat must be a mini-lion

may i never, ever see a lion’s tongue this closely!😃

Thanks for the explanation...I thought it was yours and you had been bitten by an Arkansas werewolf!!!?!

I wish I could attach a pic. My kitten's tongue looks just like this, in miniature. lol

beautiful teeth!

Nature!

Gary Camacho

Zyan VR

Adam Vara

Yowch

Yikes

Wowza!

I would still let him himbs luv on me.

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