Monarch Butterfly

Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.

Great BIG Nature showcases the wonders of nature.

Our award-winning stories spark conversations, shift perspectives, and inspire new ideas, helping to not only shed new light on our planet’s most pressing environmental challenges, but to also drive change! We tell stories that matter!

This Week’s Top Picks

An experience of a lifetime. Great BIG Nature recently returned from the Galapagos and had the incredible fortune of swimming with a group of dolphins. It is a moment we wish all could experience! Watch for the full story!
You might be surprised to learn one of the loudest mammals on the planet is a lemur. It’s true. So we traveled to the forests of Madagascar's northeast region, in the Anjanaharibe-Sub wildlife preserve, to witness this phenomenon in person!
Great BIG Nature traveled to the remote Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia Canada to document the end of the Southern Most herd of Caribou in the world. This is Must watch stuff!
Travel
Discovery
News

The Hippo Whisperer

Jane Goodall and her son, Grub, are trying to save a hippo sanctuary in Southern Tanzania. We went to tell their incredible story and meet the man they call “The Hippo Whisperer!”

Connect with Great BIG Nature

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
2 days ago
Great BIG Nature

Nature's rock star! Can you spot the hellbender? Thanks to their sedentary lifestyle, these giant amphibians can live for 30 years and grow to 2 feet long (.6 m). They also breathe through their skin and use their mouths to vacuum-suck their prey.
Connect with Nature!
Photo: David Herasimtschuk
... See MoreSee Less

Natures rock star! Can you spot the hellbender? Thanks to their sedentary lifestyle, these giant amphibians can live for 30 years and grow to 2 feet long (.6 m). They also breathe through their skin and use their mouths to vacuum-suck their prey. 
Connect with Nature!
Photo: David Herasimtschuk
3 days ago
Great BIG Nature

A Eurasian jay takes on a juvenile sparrowhawk. And believe it or not, these two birds go 'toe to toe' more often than you might think.
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Pål Hermansen
... See MoreSee Less

A Eurasian jay takes on a juvenile sparrowhawk. And believe it or not, these two birds go toe to toe more often than you might think. 
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Pål Hermansen
4 days ago
Great BIG Nature

These young bighorn sheep are still trying to figure out how to do battle!
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

To look inside the mouth of a leatherback sea turtle, most people are surprised by what they see. These amazing creatures are a true marvel of nature and have a unique feeding mechanism designed to trap its prey, primarily jellyfish. The mouth and esophagus are lined with sharp, fleshy projections known as papillae. As the turtle consumes its prey, the backward facing papillae grip onto the jellyfish, preventing it from slipping back out while the turtle expels excess salt water using the muscles in its throat.
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

To look inside the mouth of a leatherback sea turtle, most people are surprised by what they see. These amazing creatures are a true marvel of nature and have a unique feeding mechanism designed to trap its prey, primarily jellyfish. The mouth and esophagus are lined with sharp, fleshy projections known as papillae. As the turtle consumes its prey, the backward facing papillae grip onto the jellyfish, preventing it from slipping back out while the turtle expels excess salt water using the muscles in its throat. 
Connect with Nature!Image attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment
1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

The incredible world of tree bark... its more complicated than you might think! Bark provides many different functions to trees. Some of these functions are rather self-explanatory, such as protecting the plant stem and making the tree stiff so it can better withstand external stimuli. Some other functions, however, are a bit more surprising, such as aerating the tree, providing water storage, helping in photosynthesis, harboring carbon directly from sunlight, and acting as a microhabitat for different organisms. Within the bark, there is also the lenticels. These lenticels provide a variety of different functions to the tree such as promoting gas exchange, performing transpiration at night, preventing cracks in the bark, helping to balance the tree's carbon levels, helping the tree recover from drought stress, and repairing the wood. For example, take the beech tree. Its smooth bark protects the tree from insects and ivy so they can't gain a foothold. However, in order to grow this type of smooth bark, the bark has to be grown very slowly. This means that not only does the tree itself grow slow, but it also takes a long time for wounds to heal. The oak tree has the exact opposite problem as the beech tree. Its bark grows very fast, allowing it to repair itself on the fly. However, this speedy growth causes the bark to grow with cracks and wrinkles all over. This makes it easier for insects to get in the bark and for ivy to grow along the tree. To combat insects, the oak tree spends lots of energy to produce extra tannins as a defense mechanism. Another example of bark complexity can be found on birch trees. Their thin bark gets shed regularly in order to help cleanse themselves of moss and lichen infestations. So you see.... bark is complicated.
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

The incredible world of tree bark... its more complicated than you might think! Bark provides many different functions to trees. Some of these functions are rather self-explanatory, such as protecting the plant stem and making the tree stiff so it can better withstand external stimuli. Some other functions, however, are a bit more surprising, such as aerating the tree, providing water storage, helping in photosynthesis, harboring carbon directly from sunlight, and acting as a microhabitat for different organisms. Within the bark, there is also the lenticels. These lenticels provide a variety of different functions to the tree such as promoting gas exchange, performing transpiration at night, preventing cracks in the bark, helping to balance the trees carbon levels, helping the tree recover from drought stress, and repairing the wood. For example, take the beech tree. Its smooth bark protects the tree from insects and ivy so they cant gain a foothold. However, in order to grow this type of smooth bark, the bark has to be grown very slowly. This means that not only does the tree itself grow slow, but it also takes a long time for wounds to heal. The oak tree has the exact opposite problem as the beech tree. Its bark grows very fast, allowing it to repair itself on the fly. However, this speedy growth causes the bark to grow with cracks and wrinkles all over. This makes it easier for insects to get in the bark and for ivy to grow along the tree. To combat insects, the oak tree spends lots of energy to produce extra tannins as a defense mechanism. Another example of bark complexity can be found on birch trees. Their thin bark gets shed regularly in order to help cleanse themselves of moss and lichen infestations. So you see.... bark is complicated.
Connect with Nature!Image attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment
1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

The towering peak of Segla on Senja Island off the coast of northern Norway.
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

The towering peak of Segla on Senja Island off the coast of northern Norway.
Connect with Nature!
2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

This is a microscopic photo of a butterfly egg. Most butterflies deposit a cluster of tiny eggs, sometimes hundreds of them, on the underside of a leaf, fastening them there with a glue-like substance. The leaves provide protection, and later food for the young caterpillars. But the geometric beauty of these eggs really is something.
Connect with Nature.
Photo: Louie Schwartzberg
... See MoreSee Less

This is a microscopic photo of a butterfly egg. Most butterflies deposit a cluster of tiny eggs, sometimes hundreds of them, on the underside of a leaf, fastening them there with a glue-like substance. The leaves provide protection, and later food for the young caterpillars. But the geometric beauty of these eggs really is something.
Connect with Nature.
Photo: Louie Schwartzberg
2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

The Venezuelan Poodle Moth. This moth was recently discovered in 2009 and is said to resemble a poodle. That is, if poodles had huge wings and feathers instead of ears. So far, its taxonomy hasn’t been established, but we do know the fluff you see on its body is made of chitin, which is basically the insect equivalent of cellulose; the material that makes up the cell walls in plants. It might also surprise you to know there are over 160,000 types of moths on the planet. So, still much to learn.
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

The Venezuelan Poodle Moth. This moth was recently discovered in 2009 and is said to resemble a poodle. That is, if poodles had huge wings and feathers instead of ears. So far, its taxonomy hasn’t been established, but we do know the fluff you see on its body is made of chitin, which is basically the insect equivalent of cellulose; the material that makes up the cell walls in plants. It might also surprise you to know there are over 160,000 types of moths on the planet. So, still much to learn.
Connect with Nature!
3 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Photos from Great BIG Adventures's post ... See MoreSee Less

Image attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment
4 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Like many whales, the Blue Whale or Gray Whale do not have teeth, but instead relies on baleen plates to catch its prey. These plates, which are a horny form of whalebone, act like a fence... or hair net, and filters massive amounts of sea water too ultimately catch its tiny prey in the plates.
Connect with Nature!
... See MoreSee Less

Like many whales, the Blue Whale or Gray Whale do not have teeth, but instead relies on baleen plates to catch its prey. These plates, which are a horny form of whalebone, act like a fence... or hair net, and filters massive amounts of sea water too ultimately catch its tiny prey in the plates. 
Connect with Nature!Image attachmentImage attachment
1 month ago
Great BIG Nature

Shafts of sun highlight this amazing scene in the forests of the Andaman Islands as this elephant, named Rajan, takes his early morning walk in the jungle.
Photo: Jody MacDonald
... See MoreSee Less

Shafts of sun highlight this amazing scene in the forests of the Andaman Islands as this elephant, named Rajan, takes his early morning walk in the jungle.
Photo: Jody MacDonald
Load more

3 million and counting…

That’s how many views we get each month.
Thanks for your support.