Monarch Butterfly

Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.

Great BIG Nature showcases the wonders of nature.

Our award-winning stories spark conversations, shift perspectives, and inspire new ideas, helping to not only shed new light on our planet’s most pressing environmental challenges, but to also drive change! We tell stories that matter!

This Week’s Top Picks

An experience of a lifetime. Great BIG Nature recently returned from the Galapagos and had the incredible fortune of swimming with a group of dolphins. It is a moment we wish all could experience! Watch for the full story!
You might be surprised to learn one of the loudest mammals on the planet is a lemur. It’s true. So we traveled to the forests of Madagascar's northeast region, in the Anjanaharibe-Sub wildlife preserve, to witness this phenomenon in person!
Great BIG Nature traveled to the remote Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia Canada to document the end of the Southern Most herd of Caribou in the world. This is Must watch stuff!
Travel
Discovery
News

The Hippo Whisperer

Jane Goodall and her son, Grub, are trying to save a hippo sanctuary in Southern Tanzania. We went to tell their incredible story and meet the man they call “The Hippo Whisperer!”

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2 days ago
Great BIG Nature

This photo will trick your mind. What looks like a piece of art is actually a few gazelles galloping amongst their shadows. Photo taken in the Namib sand dunes from high above.
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Photo: Solly Levi
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This photo will trick your mind. What looks like a piece of art is actually a few gazelles galloping amongst their shadows. Photo taken in the Namib sand dunes from high above. 
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Solly Levi
4 days ago
Great BIG Nature

The North Island brown kiwi, a unique bird native to New Zealand, holds a fascinating record in the avian world. It lays an egg that is an astonishing 15-22% of its body weight, a feat unparalleled among land birds. To put this into perspective, a human baby at full term is only about 5% of its mother’s body weight. Another fun fact about the kiwi bird: they can live up to 50 years!
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The North Island brown kiwi, a unique bird native to New Zealand, holds a fascinating record in the avian world. It lays an egg that is an astonishing 15-22% of its body weight, a feat unparalleled among land birds. To put this into perspective, a human baby at full term is only about 5% of its mother’s body weight. Another fun fact about the kiwi bird: they can live up to 50 years!
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6 days ago
Great BIG Nature

Japanese snow fairy.
The "Japanese snow fairy," or Shima-enaga, is a subspecies of the long-tailed tit found only in Hokkaido, Japan. These small, fluffy white birds are beloved for their cute appearance, especially in winter. They are a regional symbol and often featured in local art.
Photos: Brian Smith
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Japanese snow fairy.
The Japanese snow fairy, or Shima-enaga, is a subspecies of the long-tailed tit found only in Hokkaido, Japan. These small, fluffy white birds are beloved for their cute appearance, especially in winter. They are a regional symbol and often featured in local art. 
Photos: Brian Smith
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6 days ago
Great BIG Nature

A cluster of macaques folds into a cuddle puddle known as a saru dango, or “monkey dumpling,” pooling body heat on a frigid day in Shodoshima Island, Japan.
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Photo: Alexandre Bonnefoy
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A cluster of macaques folds into a cuddle puddle known as a saru dango, or “monkey dumpling,” pooling body heat on a frigid day in Shodoshima Island, Japan. 
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Photo: Alexandre Bonnefoy
1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

Moqui marbles.
The stony spheres are concretions — sandstone balls cemented by a hard shell of iron oxide minerals. Often called moqui marbles, acres of the chocolate-coloured rocks are scattered across Utah and Arizona. They tumble from the cream-colored Navajo Sandstone beds, when wind and water wash away the softer rock.
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Moqui marbles. 
The stony spheres are concretions — sandstone balls cemented by a hard shell of iron oxide minerals. Often called moqui marbles, acres of the chocolate-coloured rocks are scattered across Utah and Arizona. They tumble from the cream-colored Navajo Sandstone beds, when wind and water wash away the softer rock.
Connect with Nature!
1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

The ability of nature to blend into its surroundings is well documented by this Golden Plover chick. They are perfectly matched to their mossy hiding places in the Arctic tundra, making it almost impossible for predators to find them.
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Photo: Camilo Carneiro
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The ability of nature to blend into its surroundings is well documented by this Golden Plover chick. They are perfectly matched to their mossy hiding places in the Arctic tundra, making it almost impossible for predators to find them.
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Camilo Carneiro
2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Charging up a sand dune in a hot Namibian desert is no easy feat, but this gemsbok appears determined to reach the cool, moist breeze that flows over the ridgeline from the nearby Atlantic Ocean.
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Photo: Buddy Eleazer
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Charging up a sand dune in a hot Namibian desert is no easy feat, but this gemsbok appears determined to reach the cool, moist breeze that flows over the ridgeline from the nearby Atlantic Ocean.
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Buddy Eleazer
2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Pollia condensate, popularly called "marble berry," stands out as one of Africa's most fascinating plants. This fruit can’t be eaten raw, cooked or turned into a beverage. Its basically useless to any animal or human. In Western Uganda and elsewhere though, the plant’s small metallic fruits have long been used for decorative purposes because of an unusual property: They stay a vibrant blue colour for years or even decades after they’ve been picked. This fruit’s tissue is more intensely coloured than any previously studied biological tissue - reflecting 30 percent of light, as compared to a silver mirror (the highest recorded on any known biological material). The vast majority of colours in the biological world are produced by pigments - this plant however produces its vibrant blue via tiny, nanoscale cellulose strands that are stacked inside its skin... and that's the reason the fruit’s colour lasts so remarkably long, because its built into the plants structure, rather than relying on pigments that can degrade over time. Researchers have taken a stab at explaining why the plant would go to such trouble to look so inviting. By imitating the appearance of a juicy, nutritious plant, the colour can trick birds and animals into eating the fruit, thereby widely dispersing the seeds inside when they defecate. Although using animals for dispersal is a strategy common to many plants, most are forced to devote precious calories to produce a sweet, fleshy pulp. This plant however, is able to spread its seeds through deception. Well played marble berry... well played!
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Pollia condensate, popularly called marble berry, stands out as one of Africas most fascinating plants. This fruit can’t be eaten raw, cooked or turned into a beverage. Its basically useless to any animal or human. In Western Uganda and elsewhere though, the plant’s small metallic fruits have long been used for decorative purposes because of an unusual property: They stay a vibrant blue colour for years or even decades after they’ve been picked. This fruit’s tissue is more intensely coloured than any previously studied biological tissue - reflecting 30 percent of light, as compared to a silver mirror (the highest recorded on any known biological material). The vast majority of colours in the biological world are produced by pigments - this plant however produces its vibrant blue via tiny, nanoscale cellulose strands that are stacked inside its skin... and thats the reason the fruit’s colour lasts so remarkably long, because its built into the plants structure, rather than relying on pigments that can degrade over time. Researchers have taken a stab at explaining why the plant would go to such trouble to look so inviting. By imitating the appearance of a juicy, nutritious plant, the colour can trick birds and animals into eating the fruit, thereby widely dispersing the seeds inside when they defecate. Although using animals for dispersal is a strategy common to many plants, most are forced to devote precious calories to produce a sweet, fleshy pulp. This plant however, is able to spread its seeds through deception. Well played marble berry... well played!
Connect with Nature!Image attachmentImage attachment
2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

As bushfires ravaged through Australia in 2018, slow-moving koalas had slim odds of surviving the fast-burning blazes... yet this fella survived.
Photo: Julie Richard
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As bushfires ravaged through Australia in 2018, slow-moving koalas had slim odds of surviving the fast-burning blazes... yet this fella survived. 
Photo: Julie Richard
2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants in the world. It has been recorded at growing 119 cm (47.6 in) in 24 hours. Some species can even grow over a meter per day under optimal conditions. Also, a grove of bamboo releases 35% more oxygen than any other tree out there. And since bamboos can be harvested in 3-5 years compared to the 50-60 years of most softwood trees, maybe its time to think more bamboo!
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Bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants in the world. It has been recorded at growing 119 cm (47.6 in) in 24 hours. Some species can even grow over a meter per day under optimal conditions. Also, a grove of bamboo releases 35% more oxygen than any other tree out there. And since bamboos can be harvested in 3-5 years compared to the 50-60 years of most softwood trees, maybe its time to think more bamboo!
Connect with Nature!Image attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment
3 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

The 'almost' immortal Axolotis!
Axolotls, or the Mexican Walking Fish, are a type of salamander native to Mexico, renowned for their remarkable regenerative abilities. They can regenerate lost limbs, parts of their brain, spinal cord, and even organs such as their heart and lungs. Incredibly, they can grow back lost limbs in only a few weeks and can regrow the same limb up to 5 times. Then it stops. The feathery looking branches that extend from either side of its head are its gills, but they also have lungs that are fully functional. The Axolotl, is also 1,000 times more resistant to cancer than mammals. So, how do they do it? Many questions.
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The almost immortal Axolotis!
Axolotls, or the Mexican Walking Fish, are a type of salamander native to Mexico, renowned for their remarkable regenerative abilities. They can regenerate lost limbs, parts of their brain, spinal cord, and even organs such as their heart and lungs.  Incredibly, they can grow back lost limbs in only a few weeks and can regrow the same limb up to 5 times. Then it stops. The feathery looking branches that extend from either side of its head are its gills, but they also have lungs that are fully functional. The Axolotl, is also 1,000 times more resistant to cancer than mammals. So, how do they do it? Many questions.
Connect with Nature!Image attachmentImage attachment
3 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Boreal forest lake. Canada.
Photo: D. Langhorst.
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Boreal forest lake. Canada.
Photo: D. Langhorst.
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