Monarch Butterfly

Weighing no more than a paperclip, this unbelievable insect makes a 4500 km journey that absolutely boggles the mind.

Great BIG Nature showcases the wonders of nature.

Our award-winning stories spark conversations, shift perspectives, and inspire new ideas, helping to not only shed new light on our planet’s most pressing environmental challenges, but to also drive change! We tell stories that matter!

This Week’s Top Picks

An experience of a lifetime. Great BIG Nature recently returned from the Galapagos and had the incredible fortune of swimming with a group of dolphins. It is a moment we wish all could experience! Watch for the full story!
You might be surprised to learn one of the loudest mammals on the planet is a lemur. It’s true. So we traveled to the forests of Madagascar's northeast region, in the Anjanaharibe-Sub wildlife preserve, to witness this phenomenon in person!
Great BIG Nature traveled to the remote Selkirk Mountains in British Columbia Canada to document the end of the Southern Most herd of Caribou in the world. This is Must watch stuff!
Travel
Discovery
News

The Hippo Whisperer

Jane Goodall and her son, Grub, are trying to save a hippo sanctuary in Southern Tanzania. We went to tell their incredible story and meet the man they call “The Hippo Whisperer!”

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6 days ago
Great BIG Nature

In 2015, a Yale University study estimated there were roughly three trillion trees still standing on Earth (which was more than they expected). Then in 2022, another group of researchers concluded there were 73,000 tree species globally, among which 9,000 tree species have yet to be discovered — 9,000 unknown species! Who knew?
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In 2015, a Yale University study estimated there were roughly three trillion trees still standing on Earth (which was more than they expected). Then in 2022, another group of researchers concluded there were 73,000 tree species globally, among which 9,000 tree species have yet to be discovered — 9,000 unknown species! Who knew?
Connect with Nature!
7 days ago
Great BIG Nature

If you were to slap together parts from 6 different birds, you might end up with a bird that looks like the Golden Pheasant. This beautiful bird is mostly found in the mountains of western China, but can also be found across the United Kingdom. And if you want to see one, dont look up - look down, since they are more into running than flying.
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If you were to slap together parts from 6 different birds, you might end up with a bird that looks like the Golden Pheasant. This beautiful bird is mostly found in the mountains of western China, but can also be found across the United Kingdom. And if you want to see one, dont look up - look down, since they are more into running than flying. 
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1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

Sunrise over the Rocky mountains in Alberta, Canada.
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1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

Sometimes, even the 'King of the Jungle' knows when it's time to retreat! Trust us, these buffalo can get really cranky! We had one ram our truck once and the damage it caused was considerable. It got our attention!
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Sometimes, even the King of the Jungle knows when its time to retreat! Trust us, these buffalo can get really cranky! We had one ram our truck once and the damage it caused was considerable. It got our attention!
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Comment on Facebook

This definitely brings Mufasa to mind.

I don't want to be the firefighter who gets the call to get the 'kitty' out of the tree! ha ha

You got that right!!!

Have never understood the " King of the Jungle " title. Lions don't live in jungles.

Dallas Brett Have you seen anything like it?

I don't know if this ir real..

M'Bogo

What jungle?

The question is, how long can the King hang on?

Thank goodness for claws.

Fake

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1 week ago
Great BIG Nature

Elephant shrews are not rodents, but we can see how most people would think that. The creature is one of the fastest small mammals, having been recorded to reach speeds of 28.8 kp/h (17.9 mph). And compared to other mammalian insectivores, they have relatively large brains. Their most noticeable feature is an elongated snout, which they twist and turn, like an elephant, when searching for prey (insects, worms, and other creatures without spines). And that tongue... well it uses it to toss dinner into its mouth much like an anteater would. Like we said - don't call me a rodent!
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Found mostly in Southern Africa regions
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Elephant shrews are not rodents, but we can see how most people would think that. The creature is one of the fastest small mammals, having been recorded to reach speeds of 28.8 kp/h (17.9 mph). And compared to other mammalian insectivores, they have relatively large brains. Their most noticeable feature is an elongated snout, which they twist and turn, like an elephant, when searching for prey (insects, worms, and other creatures without spines). And that tongue... well it uses it to toss dinner into its mouth much like an anteater would. Like we said - dont call me a rodent!
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Found mostly in Southern Africa regions

Comment on Facebook

So adorable

you seem to get smaller and smaller Jeanette Bacalso🤣

Shawn Fiedler look how cute!!

insectivora?

Rodents are mammals...

Joseline A. Huerta

Niki McGuire

Ashley Holscher Brown

Nyctibius Nat

Robyn Maxwell

Alice Winstanley but are they more of an elephant or more of a shrew?

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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Walruses are more intelligent than you might think. One of the most obvious signs of intelligence in marine mammals, like walruses, is social learning and group coordination. This is because they are one of the very few mammals, other than humans, which socially mimic each other’s vocalizations and behaviour.
Don't believe us - watch this video.
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Video: Brian Keating
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💚That's great Brian, it's my first time to see walruses but looks to be amazing animals , Thanks for sharing.

Awful name, poor boy! He seems smart and sweet! Which zoo?No tusks?

Awesome ♥️

Not ugly. Charming❤️

2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Not sure who is winning this battle... but it seems the snake's strategy is to wrap itself around the Heron's beak to avoid any possible issues. Might work - might not!
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Not sure who is winning this battle... but it seems the snakes strategy is to wrap itself around the Herons beak to avoid any possible issues. Might work - might not! 
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Poor snakey, but a great shot!

the snake is killing himself he is holding the birds beak around his neck

Heron wins this battle im sure

Almost a choke hole get it on Bro

Hope not

Water moccasin or Cotton mouth is deadly bite

Snakes have to eat to live and I can't see how this poor bird is going to get away from this.

Snake is toast 💯

Scary… I’m pulling for the Heron.

The heron needs a friend who loves snake meat!

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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

Believe or not, whales have arm, wrist & finger bones in their front fins that resemble a human hand... thumb included. For example, this photo is the front fin bones of a Grey whale. All cetaceans (Whales, Dolphins, Porpoises) and Pinnipeds (Seals, Sea Lions, Walruses) have flippers. However, inside those flippers are bones that resemble a human hand.
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Photo: Dr. Mark D Scherz
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Believe or not, whales have arm, wrist & finger bones in their front fins that resemble a human hand... thumb included. For example, this photo is the front fin bones of a Grey whale. All cetaceans (Whales, Dolphins, Porpoises) and Pinnipeds (Seals, Sea Lions, Walruses) have flippers. However, inside those flippers are bones that resemble a human hand. 
Connect with Nature!
Photo: Dr. Mark D Scherz

Comment on Facebook

So we are evolution of whales 🐳

Whales used to be land animals.

Oh comme nous incroyable 😮😮s 'est a se poser des questions .

As do seals. But additionally, seals have finger nails!

Looks more like the feet of animal that once walked on land.

Sure looks like the Giant of Kandahar.

Están evolucionando o involucionando?

👍🏻

Nick Hosch

Olivier Grégoire

Sophie Jayne

Hmmmmmmm never knew that.

Jamee Jensen Fry, Larry Fry, Susan Rossi, fascinating!

So do they articulate or are they solid ?

Rachel

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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

This is why leopard's have spots!
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Photo: Bruce Phelan
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This is why leopards have spots!
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Photo: Bruce Phelan

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Wow! Photo credit?

I stole this

did anyone else think this was some kind of snake-giraffe creature for the first 30 seconds? asking for a friend…

Wow Mother Nature at its best

Great picture

Whaou!! Fantastique .est très beau ❤️❤️👏

Incroyable !

Good camo as long as it stays stretched out on the tree trunk!

Lindsey Michie

Michelle E. Palomarez

Rita Saffell

What leopard? 😁

Very capable disguise!

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2 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

King Penguins / Location: Sub-Antarctica
Photo: Wim van den Heever
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King Penguins / Location: Sub-Antarctica
Photo: Wim van den Heever

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I doubt this is in Antarctica, king penguins do not live there....

Absolutely spectacular!

They are incredible!!!

Wow amazing photo

Amazing!

They took a picture but made an album cover

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3 weeks ago
Great BIG Nature

The Tripod fish, or if you prefer their latin name (grallator), which means 'one who walks on stilts', is as strange as they come. This deep-sea fish has elongated pelvic fins and an elongated tail fin which it uses to ‘stand’ motionless on the seafloor. Not swim... but stand! From there, it faces the deep-sea currents and waits for food to come swimming by. And, we should probably mention the tripod fish is also virtually blind - so there's that. And one final fun fact: they’re simultaneous hermaphrodites. They have both male and female reproductive organs (ovotestis) that mature at the same time! Like we said... one strange fish! ... See MoreSee Less

The Tripod fish, or if you prefer their latin name (grallator), which means one who walks on stilts, is as strange as they come. This deep-sea fish has elongated pelvic fins and an elongated tail fin which it uses to ‘stand’ motionless on the seafloor. Not swim... but stand! From there, it faces the deep-sea currents and waits for food to come swimming by. And, we should probably mention the tripod fish is also virtually blind - so theres that. And one final fun fact: they’re simultaneous hermaphrodites. They have both male and female reproductive organs (ovotestis) that mature at the same time! Like we said... one strange fish!

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Googling this...so many questions. Wondering if the tripod legs telescope, or angle & tuck behind the fish so it can swim. Most species "designs" make sense to me. This one just doesn't at first glance.

Talk about a blind date! 🤣

Blake Durdle

JLuis

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